What is Atrial Septal Defect?

Atrial Septal Defect

An atrial septal defect (ASD) — sometimes referred to as a hole in the heart — is a type of congenital heart defect in which there is an abnormal opening in the dividing wall between the upper filling chambers of the heart.

Kids with an atrial septal defect have an opening in the wall (septum) between the atria. As a result, some oxygenated blood from the left atrium flows through the hole in the septum into the right atrium, where it mixes with oxygen-poor blood and increases the total amount of blood that flows toward the lungs. The increased blood flow to the lungs creates creates a swishing sound, known as a heart murmur. This heart murmur, along with other specific heart sounds that can be detected by a cardiologist, can be clues that a child has an ASD.

Once an ASD is diagnosed, treatment will depend on the child’s age and the size, location, and severity of the defect. In kids with very small ASDs, the defect may close on its own. Larger ASDs usually won’t close, and must be treated medically. Most of these can be closed in a cardiac catheterization lab, although some will require open-heart surgery.

If surgical repair for ASD is necessary, a child will undergo open-heart surgery. In this procedure, a surgeon makes a cut in the chest and a heart-lung machine is used to maintain circulation while the heart surgeon closes the hole. The ASD may be closed directly with stitches or by sewing a patch of surgical material over the defect. Eventually, the tissue of the heart heals over the patch or stitches, and by 6 months after the surgery, the hole will be completely covered with tissue.

 

info from kidshealth.org

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: